Category: Pan

Full Review: Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Frying Pan

Skeppshult Traditional Walnut Handle Fry Pan
Full Review: Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Frying Pan 1

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Pros
– Very durable
– Noble look
– Shipped seasoned
Cons
– Heavy
– Low rim

Conclusion

The Skeppshult cast iron pan is a design piece and fulfils its tasks perfectly. For everyday use we often opt for other pans such as the De Buyer Mineral B Element or the Lodge Combo Cooker. They are more versatile. But there is probably no better and more suitable pan to present your food to your guests at the table. And the pan will keep it warm for a long time as well. A very good pan, but it also has its price.

Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Review

Probably the most beautiful pan in our arsenal is the Skeppshult cast iron frying pan with wooden handle. In this test, we take a closer look at the Swedish frying pan.

Material and Workmanship

Skeppshult Review

The pan is made of cast iron in one piece. The handle is made of walnut wood except for the eyelet at the end of the handle. The brand name Skeppshult is burned into the handle. The wood is beautifully polished and the rest of the pan is perfectly finished. It is already seasoned, which saves a lot of work.

Full Review: Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Frying Pan 2

The bottom is flat when heated and the pan does not wobble a bit.

Handling of the Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan

Like all cast iron pans, the Skeppshult frying pan is not a lightweight. Even the 9.5 inch / 24 cm variant weighs just under 4.4 pound / 2 kg, the 11 inch / 28 cm variant weighs a proud 6.2 pound / 2.8 kg. This makes pivoting and moving the pan a bit difficult. The counter-grip, which is also made of cast iron, helps a bit.

Skeppshult Pan Review

The special feature of the pan, the wooden handle, has advantages and disadvantages. The handle can be used without problems, even if the pan is very hot. But on the other hand, the pan cannot be used in the oven and the pan is also taboo on the grill: the wood would be damaged by the high heat. There are probably also people who wrap the handle in a damp cloth and then put it in the oven, but we do not recommend such experiments. Therefore, the pan should never be seasoned in the oven, if it should ever be necessary! We also find the shape somewhat unfavorable: the edges of the Skeppshult frying pan are not particularly high. If you make food that you have to stir a lot you have to be careful so it does not fall out. This makes the pan more suitable for dishes that do not require a lot of stirring.

Thermal Properties of the Skillet

Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Review

The pan takes a little longer than the De Buyer Mineral B Element to get to 392° F / 200° and about the same length as the pan of the Lodge Combo-Cookers. It took her 1:54 minutes to reach 212° F / 100° C on the electric hob and 3:14 minutes to reach 392° F / 200°. That’s one of the slowest pans in our test. But that’s not surprising with the masses; The pan scores points in heat storage and looks great when served directly in the food. The heat distribution is also relatively uniform: when the pan in the center reached 212° F / 100° C, it had at a point 2 inch / 5 cm farther out a temperature of 48° F / 9 ° C and at 212° F / 100° C a temperature difference of 38.5° F / 3,6 ° Celsius. That’s very good.

Long-Term Test Skeppshult Cast Iron Frying Pan

The Skeppshult frying pan has been in operation since the beginning of 2020 and we have not yet noticed any defects. However, due to the disadvantages mentioned in the “Handling” section, we use them less frequently than our other frying pans. The pan should be rubbed with oil after frying, especially at the beginning when the patina is not yet so pronounced. Otherwise, rust will form quickly. However, we could not imagine a more beautiful pan for serving: Compliments of the guests are already included in the price.

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Technical Details of the Skeppshult Frying Pan 9.5 inch / 24 cm

Diameter pan bottom7.3 inch / 18,5 cm
Height without handle1.3 inch / 3,3 cm
Height with handle2.8 inch / 7,1 cm
Length with handle18.9 inch / 48 cm
Weight4.4 pound / 2 kg
Bake in ovenNo – has a wood handle
InductionYes
Time to reach 212° F / 100° C1:54 minutes
Time to reach 392° F / 200° C3:14 minutes
Temperature difference middle and 2 inch / 5 cm away48° F / 9 °C at 212° F / 100° C
38.5° F / 3.6 ° C at 392° F / 200° C

Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan Frying Pan

Ivan

This pan is very robust and not too heavy for a cast iron pan. As long as you do not want to finish the food in the oven you can use this pan for all your dishes.
Skeppshult Walnut Handle Fry Pan
Durability
Versability
Craftmanship
Consistency
Heat Distribution
Weight

Summary

The pan should get another 5 stars for the looks. There is probably no better and more suitable pan to present your food to your guests at the table.

4.3
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Full Review: Lodge 3 Quart Cast Iron Combo Cooker

Lodge Combi Cooker
Lodge Combo Cooker

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Pros
– Very durable
– Very versatile
– Almost unbreakable
Cons
– Food sticks quickly when used incorrectly

Conclusion
The Lodge Combo Cooker is one of our most versatile utensils. It can be used as a classic pan as well as a roaster. You can bake, braise, broil, fry, grill, roast, sauté, and sear almost anything. In addition, it is very well processed and the price very reasonable.

The disadvantages: the weight and the susceptibility to rust. You can live with both and the susceptibility to rust is the same with other iron pans.

About Lodge

Lodge is a family-owned company based in South Pittsburg (Tennessee). It was originally founded by Joseph Lodge in 1896. With over 100 years of experience Lodge has become renowned for producing the finest cast iron cookware in the world. In fact, it is the only remaining manufacturer of cast iron cookware in the USA! The company is probably best known for its Dutch Oven.

Lodge Combo Cooker Review

Lodge Combo Cooker Review
A perfect meal in the Lodge Combo Cooker

The disadvantages: the weight and the susceptibility to rust if treated wrong. You can live with both and the rust problem is the same with other iron pans.

The lodge Combi-Cooker is very often used in my kitchen. The combination pot / high pan and low pan can be used for many purposes.

I became aware of the Lodge Combo Cooker in two ways: Tim Ferriss recommends the Combo Cooker for his cooking course in his book “The 4 Hour Chef“. And Chad Robertson, one of the best American bakers, recommends the Combo Cooker for baking bread in his famous book “Tartine Bread“.

Material and Workmanship

Full Review: Lodge 3 Quart Cast Iron Combo Cooker 3

The Combo-Cooker is made in the USA. It consists of a pan and a kind of pot, both with a diameter of 10 inch / 26 cm. The pan has a height of 1.6 inch / 4,1 cm. Both are made of cast iron. The pot and pan each have a counter handle to make it easier to hold. The pans arrive already seasoned which is very convenient. Additional seasoning is not absolutely necessary. The workmanship is excellent, these pans last forever.


Handling of the Lodge 3 Quart Cast Iron Combo Cooker

Lodge 3 Quart Cast Iron Combo Cooker Review

The biggest disadvantage of the Lodge Combo-Cooker: it is very heavy. The skillet and pot weigh 13.2 pound / 6 kg together, the pan 6.6 pound / 3 kg of which, the pot 6.6 pound / 3 kg as well. This makes the two parts the heaviest cookware we have ever tested. Swiveling the pan becomes very tiring in the long run. Therefore the two pans have only a short handle: with a longer handle, the pans could hardly be lifted. Due to the opposite grips, however, the pan and pot can be lifted easy. However, it is hardly possible to swivel the pan.

Lodge Combo beaking Bread

But their weight is also their great strength: the pans can store a great deal of energy. That’s why the Combo Cooker is so suitable for baking bread: it replaces a hot stone and serves as a vessel to hold the steam.
This allows the bread to rise much better and gives it a better crust. The flat pan is also very good for baking pizzas, and here too it replaces a pizza stone.

We found a better crust could be produced with a cast-iron pan than with a pizza stone. This is because the iron pan stores more heat and releases it to the food. The combination also cuts a very good figure on the grill and open fire, the cast iron easily withstands high temperatures.

Thermal Properties of the Skillet

Due to its mass, the pan of the Combo cooker takes longer to warm up than other pans: To get to 212° F / 100° C it takes 1:53 minutes, to reach 392° F / 200° C 3:06 minutes. Due to its thickness, however, it has a very good heat distribution and is very evenly hot: at 392° F / 200° C it had only a temperature difference of 38.5° F / 3,6° C. It also stores heat for a very long time. Unfortunately, the handle also gets very hot and should only be handled with a good pot holder.

Long-Term Test Lodge Combo Cooker

You will be able to pass the Lodge Combo Cooker on to your grandchildren if you treat it right. A recommendation which we are happy to make. Due to the thickness of the material, nothing distorts this cookware. The only thing that can harm the Lodge Combo Cooker is rust. Therefore, dry your pan immediately after cleaning.
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Technical Details of the Lodge Combo Cooker

Diameter pan bottom7.9 inch / 20 cm
Height without handle1.6 inch / 4,1 cm
Height with handle1.6 inch / 4,1 cm
Length with handle16.5 inch / 42 cm
Weight6.6 pound / 3 kg
Bake in ovenSuitable for any temperature in a normal household oven
InductionYes
Time to reach 212° F / 100° C1:53 minutes
Time to reach 392° F / 200° C3:06 minutes
Temperature difference edge and
middle of the pan
55.4° F / 13° C at 212° F / 100° C
38° F / 3,6° C at 392° F / 200° C

Lodge 3 Quart Cast Iron Combo Cooker

Ivan

The Lodge Combo Cooker is one of our most versatile utensils. It can be used as a classic pan as well as a roaster. You can bake, braise, broil, fry, grill, roast, sauté, and sear almost anything. In addition, it is very well processed and the price very reasonable.
Lodge Combi Cooker
Durability
Versability
Craftmanship
Consistency
Heat Distribution
Weight

Summary

The Lodge Combo should be in every kitchen. The multitude of uses is just unbelievable. And you can not beat the price for this cooking combination. You really should try to bake bread in it as well.

4.7
Filed under: Pan

Full Review: Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line Frying Pan

Schulte-Ufer Profi Line
Schulte-Ufer Frying / Grill Pan Profi-Line i

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Pros
– Very durable
– Extremely good heat distribution
– Sturdy workmanship
– Light for the size

Cons
– Food sticks quickly when used incorrectly

Conclusion

We recommend the Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line i whenever we are asked for a good stainless steel pan. It is more expensive than other pans, but the workmanship and durability of this pan more than make up for the price. The name “Profi” is rightly given to it, this skillet is used in many of the best restaurant kitchens.

The Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line i is the pan of choice when we want to use a stainless steel pan. This test will tell you why we like the simple pan so much and whether it deserves the name Profi.

Workmanship and Material

Schulte-Ufer 6451 i

The pan is mainly made of stainless steel. Nickel-Free stainless steel is used for the pan body. Therefore the pan is also suitable for people with a nickel allergy.

Stainless steel is only weakly magnetic, a bottom suitable for induction is used. Stainless steel is not a good heat conductor, a 0.07 inch / 1.7 mm thick copper blank was used in the middle of the pan. This should ensure a more even heat distribution in the pan. This is particularly helpful for gas cookers where the heat source does not emit heat evenly under the bottom of the pan.

Schulte-Ufer Handle

The handle is welded with a rosette and with the pan body itself, which provides very good stability of the grip.

Handling of the Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line Frying pan

Stainless steel pans are not as easy to use as Teflon or burnt-in iron pans. Something quickly sticks to them. However, with a little practice, it is also possible to make fried eggs or pancakes.

Fried Potatoes

The Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line Frying pan is particularly suitable for searing hot. Stainless steel can withstand high temperatures and can be used in the oven without any problems. This makes the pan also suitable for dishes that are sautéed and then ready to cook in the oven. Sometimes we also use the pan to make pizza: it replaces the pizza stone and, in our opinion, makes the pizza even crispier than the brick. The pan can also be used on the grill.

Sometimes it’s not so bad when the food sticks to the pan: by adding liquids such as wine or broth to the pan, you can make a quick, delicious sauce, especially for meat. The handle is a simple tube, but still easy to hold.

The 9.5 inch / 24 cm version with its 2.4 pounds/ 1,1 kg weight can be handled very well. The 11 inches / 28 cm version with 3.3 pounds / 1,5 kg is therefore relatively light for size and material. It can be easily swiveled or held when cooking. The handle is only too hot to touch if it is left on the hob for a very long time.

Thermal Properties of the Pan

In terms of heat distribution, the Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line Frying pan is one of the best pans we have tested. It gets warm very quickly and evenly over the entire bottom of the pan: it took 1:33 minutes to reach 212° F / 100° C on the hob and 2:29 minutes to get to 392° F / 200° C. The heat difference is also impressive: when the center reached 212° F / 100° C, the difference to a point 2 inch / 5 cm further out was only 50° F / 9,6° C. At 392° F / 200° C the difference was only 36° F / 2.5° C.

Long-Term Test Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line

We have been using the Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line i since the middle of 2015 and cannot detect any defects. Once you’ve made friends with the frying properties of stainless steel, you can probably use this pan for a lifetime. Schulte-Ufer also gives a 10-year guarantee on the pan upon registration.

Technical Details Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line

Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line9.4 inch / 24 cm11 inch / 28 cm
Diameter pan bottom6.9 inch / 17,5 cm8.5 inch / 21,5 cm
Height without handle5 inch / 2 cm5 inch / 2 cm
Height with handle3.2 inch / 8,2 cm2.2 inch / 5,5 cm
Length with handle17.7 inch / 45 cm19.88 inch / 50,5 cm
Weight2.4 pound / 1,1 kg3.3 pound / 1,5 kg
Bake in ovenYes – up to 464° F / 240° CYes – up to 464° F / 240° C
InductionYesYes
Time to reach 212° F / 100° C1:3 minutes1:3 minutes
Time to reach 392° F / 200° C2:29 minutes2:29 minutes
Temperature difference middle and 2 inch / 5 cm further out 36° F / 2.2° C at 212° F / 100° C and
36° F / 2.5° C at 392° F / 200° C
36° F / 2.2° C at 212° F / 100° C and
36° F / 2.5° C at 392° F / 200° C
Dishwasher safeYesYes
Warranty10 years after registration 10 years after registration

Schulte-Ufer 6451 i Profi-Line Frying Pan

Ivan

We recommend the Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line i as one of the best stainless steel pan. It is more expensive than other pans, but the workmanship and durability of this pan more than makeup for the price.
Schulte-Ufer Profi Line
Durability
Versability
Craftmanship
Consistency
Heat Distribution
Weight

Summary

The Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line i is the pan of choice when we want to use a stainless steel pan.

4.8
Filed under: Pan

Full Review: De Buyer Mineral B Element Iron Pan

De Buyer Mineral B Element
De Buyer Mineral B Element

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Pros
– Very durable
– Very versatile with good patina
– Sturdy workmanship
– Not to heavy for an iron pan
– Versatile
Cons
– Epoxy resin on the handle can melt in the oven
– Variants with larger diameter can bend

Conclusion

Even if the De Buyer Mineral B Element has minor disadvantages, we can still recommend it very much. The high quality workmanship will make you smile even after years of use. We were also very satisfied with the pan in the long-term test. The heat distribution is not optimal, but this is unfortunately the case with iron pans of this thickness. We recommend the 9.4 inch / 24 cm version of the pan as it is less susceptible to deformation. It is perfect for a steak, two fried eggs or two smaller fish fillets.

The De Buyer Mineral B Element is one of our favorite skillets. Why? Because it is cheap, robust and not too heavy for an iron pan. It is made in France.

The De Buyer frying pan tested here has a diameter of 11 inch / 28 cm. It is also available in 7.9 inch / 20 cm, 9.4 inch / 24 cm, and 912.5 inch / 32 cm versions. These are identical in construction and our test also applies to these frying pans. The bottom of the 11 inch / 28 cm version has a diameter of 8 inch / 20.5 cm. The bottom of the pan is 0.11 inch / 3 mm thick.

The pan is suitable for all heat sources: induction, gas and electric stoves. Since it is made entirely of iron, the De Buyer frying pan can also be used in the oven, e.g. Steaks ready to roast (see the notes below).

The pan is coated with a beeswax finish so it does not rust during storage prior to sale. The pan must be cleaned and seasoned before use to develop anti-stick properties.

Workmanship and Material

De Buyer Mineral B Element

De Buyer has been producing iron pans and skillets for over 170 years and perfected its pans over the years. You will see and feel it when you hold the pan in your hands.
The pan is made entirely of carbon steel. This iron has a higher carbon content than cast iron.
Like all other iron pans, carbon steel is not a very good conductor of heat. The handle is riveted to the base body, which makes it very stable. The handle is covered with epoxy resin. Unfortunately, the resin melts away over time, which only visually makes a difference. In the picture below you can see it more exactly.

The heat during frying can melt the epoxy resin on the handle.
The heat during frying can melt the epoxy resin on the handle.

Be careful with De Buyer pans (and all other carbon steel pans) larger than 11 inches /26 cm: An induction heat source can deform them if it is smaller than the diameter of the pan!
You should, therefore, pay attention to the following:

  • Do not use a De Buyer pan with the booster (generally not recommended for pans).
  • The heat source should be equal to or larger than the bottom of the pan.
  • It is best not to use the pan at the highest temperature. 2/3, e.g. 6 out of 9, are sufficient in almost all cases.

Handling of the Pan

The pan has a good handle, which is covered with resin as mentioned above. This serves as thermal insulation so the handle does not get too hot. The 9.5 inch / 24 cm version with its 3 pounds/ 1,4 kg weight can be handled very well. The 11 inches / 28 cm version with 4.7 pounds / 2,15 kg, however, is much more difficult to handle. Nevertheless, the grip feels good in the hand and is save to work with.

If the pan is seasoned, it is also good for fried eggs, pancakes and fish. You can find our instructions for seasoning here: Seasoning iron pans

When you season any De Buyer pans, please note to allow the handle to cool before touch it. The epoxy resin attached to the handle becomes soft: this can cause traces to appear on the handle when it is touched. Also, be sure to remove the yellow silicone knob from the grip hole before.

Since the handle can become soft as described, we do not recommend using the pan for oven dishes. De Buyer recommends leaving the pan in the oven for a maximum of 10 minutes at 392° F / 200° C. If the pan is well seasoned, it is normally sufficient to wipe it with a paper towel. However, you can also use warm water and, if the patina is good, even detergent.
Especially if the De Buyer Mineral B Element does not have a good patina yet, it is a good idea to simply wipe the pan clean: oil remains in the pan and burns again next time. The only drawback with cleaning is that dirt can collect between the rivets. However, bacteria die quickly at the temperatures that prevail in the pan. The pan has a lyonnaise shape, i.e. the edge is slanted. This is particularly helpful if you want to slide dishes such as omelets or pancakes directly onto the plate.

Thermal Properties

We have tested the thermal properties of the pan on an electric hotplate. At full power, the pan took 1:35 minutes to reach 212° F / 100° C in the middle. To get to 392° F / 200° C the pan took 2:42 minutes and then had a difference of 81° F / 27.4° C between the middle and the measuring point at the outer edge. This is quite a lot, but still justifiable for the thickness of the pan.

Long-Term Test De Buyer Mineral B

We have been using the 11 inch / 28 cm version of De Buyer Mineral B Element for over 4 years now and are very satisfied with it. So far it has kept its shape very well and delivered good performance on induction, gas and electric hot plates. If you have induction or electric hot plates we would recommend the 10 inch / 24 cm version of the pan if you want to be on the safe side. This pan will not bend at all.

Technical Details 11 inch / 28 cm Pan

Diameter pan bottom6.7 inch / 17 cm
Height without handle1.7 inch / 4,2 cm
Height with handle4.6 inch / 11,7 cm
Length with handle16.7 inch / 42,5 cm
Weight3 pound / 1,4 kg
Bake in ovenYes – up to 10 minutes at 392° F / 200° C
InductionYes
Time to reach 212° F / 100° C1:35 minutes
Time to reach 392° F / 200° C2:42 minutes
Temperature difference edge and
middle of the pan
36° F / 2.2° C at 212° F / 100° C
81° F / 27.4° C at 392° F / 200° C

De Buyer Mineral B Element Iron Pan

Ivan

This pan is very affordable, robust and not too heavy for an iron pan
De Buyer pan
Durability
Versability
Craftmanship
Consistency
Heat Distribution
Weight

Summary

We recommend the 9.4 inch / 24 cm version of the pan as it is less susceptible to deformation.

4.7
Filed under: Pan

How to choose an Iron Pan: Pros and Cons, Buying and Cleaning Tips

Pan Heaven

You know you want to get an iron pan. Now you need to know how to choose an iron pan. First, you need to know if you want a Cast, Wrought or a Carbon Steel Pan. And after that, you will be overwhelmed by the many companies out there. We are here to help!

We like to use iron pans and iron skillets in our kitchen because they are very durable. We prefer to use these models:

1. Place: Our Favourite Frying Pan

Forged Iron Pan
De Buyer Mineral B Element

The De Buyer Mineral B Element! The iron pan we’ve been frying with for years. Not too expensive, durable and beautiful to look at. This makes the De Buyer Mineral B Element the best iron pan for us. You can find out more about this iron pan in the detailed test report of De Buyer Mineral B.
Read our full review of the pan.

2. Place: The incredible Lodge Combo Cooker

Cast Iron Pan
Lodge Combo-Cooker

Read our full review of the Lodge Combo Cooker

The Lodge Cast Iron Combo-Cooker does it all. A deep skillet, a fryer, a Dutch oven in one, plus a lid that doubles as a shallow skillet or griddle. We like to use this pan-pot combination very much. Much heavier than De Buyer’s, the cast iron pan is perfect for grilling or making pizza. Together this set is suitable for baking bread, as a roaster or for casseroles. A great all-rounder for every kitchen. For the price, you get a lot of performance. In our test report on the Lodge combi-pot, you can find out more about the possible uses.
Made in the USA

3. Place Skeppshult Frying Pan

How to choose an Iron Pan: Pros and Cons, Buying and Cleaning Tips 4
Skeppshult Frying Pan

Beautiful but expensive: Skeppshult is known for producing extremely high-quality pans. However, these also have their price. Apart from that, this pan is very good to use in the kitchen. Thanks to the beautiful wooden handle, the pan can be used very well as a serving pan and makes a high-quality impression at the table. More in our Skeppshult iron pan review.

The Essentials in Brief

Iron pans are very robust and durable when handled correctly.

Very good iron pans can be purchased from 30 $ – 50 $.

Iron pans can develop a good non-stick effect.

Iron pans have been used in the kitchen for several hundred years. Compared to many other types of pans, they are very robust and inexpensive, real workhorses. When used correctly, iron pans become better and better: a patina forms in the pan, which acts like an anti-stick layer and even prevents fried eggs from sticking to it. In this article, we want to give you an idea of what iron pans are all about and what their advantages and disadvantages are.
If you are looking for a good iron pan, then you should read our iron pan recommendations

The different types of Iron Pans

There are currently three types of iron pans, which differ mainly in the way they are made:

Cast Iron Pans

Cast Iron Pan

Cast iron pans are made of iron which contains between 2.5 and 4 % carbon. The iron is heated and then poured into pan molds. It is relatively brittle, but hard and does not deform. Cast iron ladles are usually heavier than carbon steel or wrought iron ladles of comparable size. For one simple reason: cast iron is usually cast thicker than the other two types of pans. A good example of a cast iron pan is the Lodge Cast Iron Combo-Cooker set.

Wrought Iron Pans

Wrought Iron Pan

Wrought iron pans are forged into shape with hammers. The iron of wrought iron pans also contains less carbon than the iron of cast iron pans. The pans are thinner than cast iron pans and therefore also lighter. However, they can also curve if there are large differences in temperature (e.g. if the center is heated much more than the edge). Under the wrought-iron pans, we can recommend the Lodge iron pan. They are even Made in the USA!
We have more information about wrought iron pans on this page.

Carbon Steel Pans

How to choose an Iron Pan: Carbon Steel Pans

Carbon steel pans are also made of unalloyed iron, which contains more carbon than wrought iron but less than cast iron. When delivered, the pans are silver, but when used they turn black. They behave similar to forged iron pans and can warp. These pans are made by deep-drawing a piece of sheet steel, i.e. a steel plate is drawn into shape. Our favorite: the De Buyer Carbon Steel Frying Pan. We have also a full review of the pan!

Properties of Iron Pans: Advantages and Disadvantages

Advantages

  • can handle high temperatures
  • develop a non-stick coating
  • very durable and robust
  • usually relatively cheap

Disadvantages

  • poor thermal diffusivity (take a long time to heat up and give off an even heat)
  • susceptible to rust if not cared for
  • Strongly acidic dishes attack the patina

Thermal properties of Iron Pans

You find a lot of nonsense about the thermal properties of iron pans on the Internet. We explain here whether it is true that iron pans provide even heat and store the heat well.

Heat distribution in Iron Pans

If an iron pan is placed on a gas burner, hot spots are created where the burner flame touches the bottom of the pan. If the middle of the iron pan is heated with a burner, the heat only slowly moves outwards. This results in a large temperature difference between the center and edge of the pan. An iron pan, therefore, conducts heat relatively poorly.
This has to do with the thermal diffusivity of iron. (If you want to know more about the thermal properties of different pan materials, we recommend this article: Pan materials

Aluminum and copper ladles conduct heat much better, resulting in a more uniform temperature in all areas of the pan.

With electric and induction stoves, the difference is not as noticeable as on gas stoves, as the heat from gas flames is concentrated on a smaller area. With induction and electric cookers, the heat distributes more evenly. The prerequisite is, of course, that the diameter of the electric/induction fields used is greater than or equal to the diameter of the pan bottom.

However, if you only use the middle of the pan, e.g. when preparing a steak, you can rather neglect the poor heat distribution. If you want to use the whole surface, however, it becomes problematic: if your food protrudes above the center, it will cook slower in the places outside the center than in the center. This leads to unevenly fried pieces of meat.

Heat Capacity of Iron Pans

Iron pans have high specific heat capacity. Therefore, it takes a relatively long time for the cast iron pans to get really warm. Aluminum, in contrast, has a much higher specific heat capacity but has a much lower density. Heating a block of aluminum and a block of cast iron of the same volume to the same temperature will keep the block of cast iron much longer warm. Since in most cases, aluminum pans are similar or the same thickness as cast iron pans, cast iron pans stay hotter longer than aluminum pans. More about the heat capacity and specific values can be found here: Heat capacity of pan materials.

In summary, this means:

  • Iron pans usually take longer to heat up
  • The temperature at the bottom of the pan is less uniform than, for example, with aluminum pans
  • Iron pans store heat longer

Seasoning Iron Ians: Rust protection and Non-Stick effect

The food sticks in the iron pan? Then your iron pan is probably not properly seasoned. New iron pans are usually not burned in and the food sticks quite to them.
Seasoning is a process in which oil, which is added to the pan and heated, creates a layer (the so-called “patina”) on the iron pan.
This burnt-in oil layer forms the basic building block for the non-stick effect. After baking, the pan should be boiled more often with a relatively large amount of fat, as the patina improves as the pan is used. Later on, less oil or fat can be used.
Unfortunately, there is no way to accelerate this process significantly.
But it is not only for the non-stick properties that baking is good: the layer forms a protection against rust.
We have summarised detailed information on seasoning and instructions in our article Seasoning an iron pan for you. There we also explain what exactly happens during the seasoning process.

What is an Iron Pan suitable for?

An iron pan is suitable for almost any dish if it is well seasoned. In the beginning, when the pan does not have a really good patina, more oil should be used.
Acidic sauce, which cooks for a long time in the iron pan, can replace the patina. Bolognese or tomato sauce is better cooked in a stainless steel pot or pan.
Iron pans are always recommended for steaks, but you can also make them in another pan. The only important thing is that it leads to a Maillard reaction, i.e. a browning of the outside of the meat. This works just as well in a Teflon pan as in an iron pan.
Iron pans can also replace a pizza stone in the oven: Iron pans store a lot of heat and can, therefore, release a lot. This leads to a much better crust.

How to clean an Iron Pan

Ideally, it is sufficient to simply wipe the pan with a paper towel. Any germs will be destroyed during the next frying process. (From 70° Celsius bacteria die off, frying is normally done at a higher temperature).
If there is still food left in the pan, you can remove it with a sponge and hot water.
Contrary to popular belief, a well-grown patina does not make much of a difference (the emphasis is on a “good” patina). If you’ve just burnt your pan and haven’t used it often, don’t use detergent). This is also confirmed by the manufacturer of cast iron pans, Lodge.

What you should not do under any circumstances:

  • Use steel wool or other very rough, hard cleaning utensils: parts of the patina can be removed by mechanical friction.
  • Dishwasher: Dishwasher cleaner is more aggressive than hand washing detergent and can damage the patina. Burnt iron pans do not belong in the dishwasher!
  • Strong detergents (oven cleaner, sodium hydroxide): these detergents dissolve baked-on oil. This is good for the oven but bad for the patina. After all, we want the patina for a good non-stick effect.
  • Soak the pan for a longer period of time: this leads to strong rust formation.

After cleaning, you should take care of your iron pan:

How to take Care of Iron Pans

Iron pans like to rust. Therefore you should rub them thinly with oil after each use. This also strengthens the non-stick effect and helps to build up the patina. Iron pans do not require any further care. Should rust form, you can simply rub it off. Either with a rough sponge or if worse with some steel wool or emery paper. The pan will then have lost some of its patina where you rubbed it. If the areas are not too large, you can simply continue to use the pan. In the case of very large areas, you should burn the pan in again afterward.

How to Choose a Iron Pan

First of all the wall thickness is important: it should be 4mm or more. Unfortunately, very few manufacturers specify the thickness of the pan bottom. If the pan bottom is too thin, the pan will quickly warp.

Another quality feature is the handle:

Riveted HandleWelded HandleCast Handle
Riveted Handle PanWelded Handle PanCast Handle Pan
Usually found on carbon steel pans (e.g. De Buyer)Usually found on forged pans, sometimes on cheap carbon steel pans.The pan is cast as a whole, the handle is part of the pan body.

With free-form hot-forged iron pans, the pan including handle is forged from one piece, i.e. the handle is connected to the pan from the beginning.

With welded pans, you should make sure that the welding points are large enough. This is often the weak point of cheap iron pans.

Also, check whether the pan can be held well. Cast iron pans are often very heavy.

How much is a good Iron Pan

Since the production of iron pans is relatively simple and the raw material is much cheaper than copper or aluminum, for example, there are usable iron pans already for around 25$. Iron pans of some manufacturers cost also over 180 $.

Iron Pans: Brands we can recommend

  • Cast Iron Pans: Lodge and Skeppshult. Lodge is much better value for money, but Skeppshult makes the nicer looking pans
  • Carbon steel pans: we have had very good experiences with De Buyer
  • Wrought iron pans: SOLIDTEKNICS and Petromax are two brands that we like to recommend.

You will find our favorite pans at the beginning of this article.

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Wrought iron pan: All about forged pans

De Buyer Mineral B Element Fry Pan
Wrought Iron Pan

We tested several wrought iron pans: The De Buyer Mineral B pan has the best value for money and is the best wrought iron frying pan for us!
You can read the full review here!

De Buyer Mineral B Element Fry Pan
De Buyer Mineral B Element Fry Pan

What is a forged Pan?

Unlike cast iron pans, forged pans are formed into pans in one piece. This usually makes them thinner than cast iron pans. In addition, they are not as brittle as cast iron pans, but they warp more easily on the stove.

Hot and cold-forged Iron Pans

Cold forged iron pans are deep-drawn. This means that in the cold state the iron blanks are pressed into the correct shape (called deep-drawing process).
In hot forged iron pans, the blanks are first heated in a fire and then formed into the correct shape with a forging hammer. Since hot forged iron pans require much more manual work, these pans are usually much more expensive.

Advantages

Wrought iron pans have some advantages, but also disadvantages.
They are very durable with good treatment. Once the patina (see below) breaks, the pan can simply be re-burned. This is not possible with PTFE / Teflon-coated pans.
Compared to cast iron pans, they have the advantage that they are usually a little lighter and therefore can also be used for panning of fried food.
However, they deform relatively easily, especially on induction stoves. Further information can be found below.
Our tip for a very good wrought-iron pan is the De Buyer Mineral B Element. We have been using the pan for several years and can recommend it to you.

Wrought iron pan

Best use of Wrought Iron Pans

A frying pan must be able to heat very high, and they must pass the heat as much as possible to the fried food. Hardly any other pan performs like the old, natural iron pan. That’s why professionals have always favored them. In terms of taste and health, dishes prepared in the uncoated iron pan are unsurpassed. Iron pans are very durable.
The roasting of steaks succeeds very well in this type of pan. If the pan is well seasoned, you can also prepare fish, eggs, and pancakes perfectly.
Not suitable are blacksmith pans for acidic foods, which are cooked in the pan for a long time. The acid dissolves the patina and it slowly crumbles. Uncoated stainless steel pans are well suited for these dishes.

Over time a patina builds up, which also stores roasting aromas. Therefore, different pans should be used for foods with a strong taste. Meat, fried potatoes, and eggs can be wonderfully prepared in the same pan. Fish, on the other hand, should have its own pan.

It is important that good iron pans in cold condition do not lie flat on the stovetop, but can be raised in the middle of the pans by up to 5mm. This is wanted and necessary because the material expands when heated and then rests flat when hot.

Heat Sources

Wrought iron pans are suitable for all types of stoves. It is always important that the stove plate is larger in diameter than the bottom of the pan (or the same size, but not smaller). Especially with induction stoves, the bottom of the pan deforms more easily if the heat source is too small. This is because the temperature differences in the pan are large and the warm iron expands.
Please note that many pan manufacturers do not specify the diameter of the pan bottom, but the diameter at the top of the pan.

Seasoning of an Iron Pan

Forged iron pans work best when seasoned. When baking oil is heated in the pan, which then decomposes at high temperatures. This “patina”, like PTFE, forms a layer on the pan. It keeps slightly sticky foods from sticking to the pan and makes cleaning easier. For detailed instructions on seasoning, see: Seasoning Wrought iron pans

Cleaning & Care of your Iron Pan

Iron pans do not need much cleaning. It is important to never put them in a dishwasher. The aggressive salts attack the patina and destroy the non-stick effect. Cleaning them in the dishwasher will also lead to rust.
It’s better this way: after roasting, it’s enough to wipe the pan thoroughly with kitchen paper. If this is not enough, the pan can be cleaned with a little bit of warm water and a sponge.
If something is burnt into the pan, let it soak with some water. You might use the heat of the switched-off stove. After approx. 30 minutes the remains can be easily removed.
In very stubborn cases you can also rub out the pan with coarse salt.
The use of dishwashing detergent hinders the build-up of a good patina.

Filed under: Pan

How to Buy the right Pan: Avoid the Biggest Mistakes

Cast iron Pan
Frying Pan

How to buy the right pan for you? Buying a pan isn’t easy. There are so many manufacturers, materials and names on the market. We try to shed some light into the darkness. This will help you with the selection of your next pan. Based on our criteria, you can find the perfect pan for you.

The Essentials in Brief: How to buy the right Pan

When you buy a pan, you should check the following criteria. You find a detailed explanation when scrolling down. Or find out more about the individual points by clicking on the respective link.

  1. Material: We recommend iron, aluminum or stainless steel.
  2. Non-stick coating/surface: Teflon or baked iron pan
  3. Diameter: 10 inch / 24 cm or 11 inch / 28 cm, depending on requirements
  4. Weight: at 10 inch / 24 cm between 1.8 – 3.3 pound (0.8 – 1.5 kg), at 11 inch / 28 cm between 2.2 – 4 pound (1 – 1.8 kg)
  5. Shape: Round is better than rectangular
  6. Edge height: depending on use. For the vast majority of cooking processes a medium-high pan edge makes sense.
  7. Handle: metal, riveted
  8. Price: good pans are available from approx. 35 $.

The Basic Material of the Pan

The material of which the pan is made is mainly responsible for the price and behavior of the pan on the stove. Frying pans are always largely made of metal, as metal conducts heat relatively well.

Pans are made from this materials or a mix of them:
  • Iron
  • Stainless steel
  • Copper
  • Aluminium

The materials differ mainly in two factors: thermal diffusivity and reactivity.
Copper conducts heat best, followed by aluminum. Stainless steel and iron are far worse off. The heat distribution in copper pans is much more uniform. The food is browned more evenly in all places. Stainless steel pans almost always have a plate of aluminum or copper embedded in them to distribute the heat better.
Since copper and aluminum can react with food, these pans are hardly made of uncoated material. Aluminum is usually coated with PTFE or ceramic, copper with stainless steel. More about the non-stick properties of the individual materials in the next section.
PTFE or Polytetrafluoroethylene is a synthetic fluoropolymer of tetrafluoroethylene – best known as Teflon.

Iron pans, in particular, can react with acidic foods. We have a separate post on how to choose an iron pan.

The most expensive pans are made of copper. Pans made of stainless steel, aluminum or iron are available in similar price categories (always depending on manufacturer and processing). We do not recommend copper pans because of the steep price tag. Although they are very suitable for cooking (which is why you often see them in upscale restaurants), they are usually many times more expensive than pans made of other metals. But if you can afford them it might make sense to own some. And they do look great.

Coated Pan
Teflon Pan

Non-stick properties/surfaces

Especially protein-rich foods such as pancakes, meat or eggs can combine with the pan under the influence of heat: the fried food sticks.
For this reason, there are non-stick coatings: PTFE (Teflon) and ceramic.
Both materials have little or no bonding with the food, the pans are much easier to clean. Ceramic, however, has the disadvantage that oil heated too high decomposes and the residues remain on the coating. This leads to an extremely reduced non-stick effect. This often happens after only a few months.
PTFE/Teflon, on the other hand, has better non-stick properties than ceramic, normally nothing sticks at all. However, the non-stick coating is rubbed off over time because the forces holding the Teflon to the pan are relatively weak.
If you want to learn more about PTFE-coated pans, you can read our article on Teflon pans.
If you want to buy a coated pan, we recommend that you buy a PTFE coated pan. In our experience, ceramic coated pans have a much shorter service life.
You can read more about this in our guide to ceramic pans. Also with Teflon pans, it is worthwhile to spend a little more money when buying pans. Especially with cheap pans, the Teflon layer wears off very quickly.

Iron pans are only available uncoated (or enameled, but for little use). Iron, however, has the great advantage that it can form a patina of oil residues, which acts like a non-stick layer. It will take some time for a good patina to form, but then iron pans can easily be used for fried eggs, pancakes and the like. If the patina is damaged, it can easily be restored.
All information about this process can be found in our article “Seasoning an Iron Pan”.

Uncoated stainless steel pans are the most difficult to handle. Almost everything will stick easily in them. This is sometimes even desired because the brown remains in the pan give a wonderful sauce when extinguished with water or wine. That’s why you often see them in restaurant kitchens. With a little practice and oil, you can also make fried eggs and pancakes. You can find out more about its use here: Stainless steel pans

What would you like to prepare?

Depending on the food you want to prepare a coating or the non-existent coating in your pan is important. Here are a few examples when to use which pan.
Food that needs a low temperature and sticks easily (eggs, pancakes, fish): PTFE or ceramic coated pan or iron pan.
Food for which high temperatures are necessary: Iron pans, stainless steel pans, ceramic pans
Acidic sauces: Teflon pans, ceramic pans, stainless steel pans Fried potatoes: all
Steaks: ceramic pans, iron pans, stainless steel pans

Weight of the Pan

When it comes to weight, you should pay attention to two things: not too heavy, not too light.

If the pan is very light, this indicates thin material. Pans with thin bottoms deform easily. Especially very cheap pans have this problem. These pans can usually be found in discount stores.

If the pan is too heavy, cooking with it can become difficult. Especially cast iron pans and pans with thick sandwich bottoms are often very heavy.

The handle also plays a role: the longer the handle is (and of course it is gripped further back), the heavier the pan seems to be. More about this in the pan grip section.

Our experience has shown that a 10in pan should weigh more than 1.8 pounds, but less than 3.3 pounds. An 11in pan should weigh more than 2.2 pounds but less than 4.4 pounds. However, these are only guidelines. There are also pans that weigh less or more and are still really good.

The Diameter of the Pan

There are pans from 4″ /10 cm (mostly to present food on them) up to 40″ / 100 cm in diameter (very large paella pans).
Most widespread and most useful are however pans in the size 10″ / 24 cm and 11″ / 28 cm.

For a one- or two-person household we recommend 10″, for more people, there should be an additional 11″ pan in the house. You can find out more about the pan diameter here: Pan diameter

The Shape of the Pan

Round or square: these are the two types of pans there are. We generally recommend buying round pans.
The reasons:

  1. it is harder to get into the corners of the pan when cleaning.
  2. Turning food in the air is much easier with round pans
  3. The heat source (cooking plate, gas ring) is usually round, a square pan gets warmer more slowly in the corners

Edge Height of the Pan

Crepe pans have the lowest edge height. The highest edges have braised pans, fish pans and sauté pans.
However, these are intended for special cases. For most applications a pan with a normal rim is sufficient. The edge is best slightly beveled to facilitate cleaning and allowing the food to slide out. It is particularly good if the pan still has a pouring rim: this facilitates the pouring of liquids.
Pans with a very high rim are usually very heavy, while pans with a low rim can easily lose something during pan stirring.

The Handle of a Pan

Different Pan Handles

Pans have either one handle, a handle and a grip on the other side or two-loop handles. A pan with two-loop handles usually only makes sense with very heavy or large pans. Handle grips become much hotter due to the design. A normal panhandle can still be touched even if the pan is hot. A detailed article on panhandles can be found here: Panhandles

Handle Material of a Pan

The panhandle is usually made of metal, wood or plastic. We recommend a metal handle: then the pan can be placed in the stove without any problems. Some plastic handles can be removed so that the pan can also be placed in the stove. However, these mechanisms often represent a weak point, they wear out faster than normal handles.

The Handle Mounting of the Pan

Handles can be either screwed, riveted, cast or welded to the pan. We have had the best experience with welded and riveted handles. The only disadvantage of riveted handles is that food remains can collect on the rivets, which makes cleaning more difficult. But the handle is also bomb-proof.

The Price of a good Pan

We advise against buying pans under 25 $ in most cases. Good pans are available from about 30 $. An ordinary pan should not cost more than 90 $. However, there are exceptions: Professional pans are clearly more expensive, but also very durable. In addition, there are pans, which are still manufactured by hand and justify thereby a higher price.

Which/how many Pans should I buy?

We recommend two pans: one with non-stick properties and a stainless steel pan.
For difficult dishes (eggs, fish,
etc.) we recommend an iron pan or a PTFE-/Teflon-coated pan.
The stainless steel pan can be used to prepare acidic sauces that will Patina of the iron pan would destroy, on the other hand, it is perfect for quenching residues.

You can find pans that we have tested in use and extensively and can, therefore, recommend here:
Our iron pans recommendations
Our top recommendation: De Buyer Mineral B Element
Read our full review of the pan. Or take a look at our guide: How to choose the best iron pan.
Our Teflon pan recommendations
Our top recommendation: Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series
Read our full review of the pan.
Our recommendations for induction-suitable pans
Our top recommendation: also the Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series
Our recommendations if you are looking for a steak pan
Our top recommendation: De Buyer Mineral B Element

We hope our guide will help you to form a more informed decision for your next pan purchase!

Filed under: Pan

Full Review: Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series Frying Pan

Tefal Jamie Oliver Hard Anodised Premium Series
Full Review: Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series Frying Pan 5

Find the best price today

Pros
– absorbs heat very quickly
– distributes the heat very evenly
– excellent non-stick coating
– great handling thanks to low weight
– sturdy workmanship
Cons
– loses the heat quickly
– the coating will not last forever

Conclusion
We recommend the Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series frying pan because it fits well in the hand and has a very durable excellent non-stick coating. Great heat absorbing and distributing makes it easy to work with. So if you’re looking for a durable, coated pan, this is the pan for you.

The Tefal Jamie Oliver is one of our absolute favorites when it comes to coated pans. Why? The pan is very well made, on the other hand, its coating lasts very long.

This is not the cheapest coated pan out there but you have to be willing to pay for an appropriate pan. Because even the supposedly cheap pans cost a lot of money and are often not up to the demands of daily use. So after a short time, you have to get a new one. A nice way to save money is to get a good one in the first place.

Workmanship and Material

Tefal Jamie Oliver Pan Bottom
The bottom of the pan

The pan consists of several materials. The main part of the skillet is made of stainless steel, which makes the pan robust. The outer bottom is made of magnetic stainless steel so that the pan can easily be used on induction cooking fields. Inside the pan, the bottom is made from aluminum for better heat conduction. This should make the pan heat up more evenly.

The Handle
Handle attachment

The handle is riveted and holds very well.

The coating is made of PTFE with a centered thermal spot to change the color as soon as the correct frying temperature is reached. The coating was in the delivery state very good and without defects. Under the item “Long-term Test” you can learn more about the durability of the coating.

Handling

The Tefal Jamie Oliver in the 11 inches/ 28 cm version with 2.7 pounds/ 1.25 kg is very light and easy to handle. And this despite the use of stainless steel. The handle lies well in the hand and does not get hot even when the pan is heated for a long time. The excellent PTFE layer makes cleaning easy. Only at the places where the rivets are, one must clean perhaps somewhat better, because here dirt collects gladly.
The pan can easily be used in the oven, but we do not recommend more than 480° F / 250° C. You should not heat the pan for more than 3 minutes on the empty stove, otherwise, fumes can develop, which are not healthy.

Thermal Properties

In our test on an electric hotplate, it took the Tefal Jamie Oliver 1:44 minutes to reach 212° F / 100° C. The temperature difference between the middle and a point 5 cm further out was 44° F / 7° C. 392° F / 200° C reached the pan after 2:49 minutes and had a heat difference at the edge of 75° F / 24° C. This is not particularly good, but also not particularly bad. Other (uncoated) stainless steel pans like the Profi-Line from Schulte-Ufer are slightly better in their temperature distribution.

Long-term Test

Long Term Test Tefal Pan

The Tefal Jamie Oliver pan convinced us very easy: after 5 years of almost daily use, nothing sticks. The coating may have a few scratches, but these are not detrimental to the non-stick effect. In addition, the pan was often cleaned in the dishwasher for convenience. This causes the non-stick coating on many inexpensive pans to wear out quickly. But not so with the Tefal Jamie Oliver: The pan roasts and fries without anything sticking to it.
We can honestly recommend it: Take a closer look at the pan now.

Technical Details

  • Diameter : 11 inches / 28 cm
  • Height in centimeters: 1.8 inches / 4.55 cm
  • Maximum temperature: 480° F / 250° C
  • Compatibility: Electric, gas, glass-ceramic and induction cookers
  • Materials: aluminum, stainless steel, TEFAL Prometal Pro non-stick sealant

Material outside: Extra-hard stainless steel
Material inside: 6-layer TEFAL Prometal Pro ® non-stick coating with hard primer and topcoat.
Cooker types: Suitable for all types of cookers, including induction
Form: Grand Chef
Colour: stainless steel
Bottom: Strong aluminum bottom for optimum flat stability, with exclusive Jamie Oliver logo.
Handles: stainless steel handle with silicone coating for non-slip handling and thermal insulation
Rim: pouring rim all around for easy pouring

PTFE is a material used in surgery. The Tefal non-stick coating does not contain PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid). The Tefal pans do not contain PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) either in the non-stick coating or in enamel, lead or cadmium.

Tefal Jamie Oliver Premium Series Frying Pan

Ivan

The Tefal Jamie Oliver pan convinced us very easy: after 5 years of almost daily use, still, nothing sticks.
efal Jamie Oliver Hard Anodised Premium Series
Durability
Versability
Craftmanship
Consistency
Heat Distribution
Weight

Summary

Very durable excellent non-stick coating. Great heat absorbing and distributing makes it easy to work with.

4.8
Filed under: Pan

The Best Pan or Best Skillet in 2020

Best Pan

Which is the best Pan or the best Skillet?

This list consists of frying pans or skillets that have been in our kitchen for years and that have prevailed over other, worse pans:

1. Place: Tefal Jamie Oliver Hard Anodised Premium Series

Tefal Jamie Oliver Hard Anodised Premium Series

If we had to recommend just one pan, it’d be Tefal Jamie Oliver. We recommend the pan because it is very well processed, still lies flat on the stove after years and the coating continues to hold very well (after 5+ years). All in all, we would say: the Tefal Jamie Oliver pan is the best pan. Read our Tefal Jamie Oliver review

2. Place: De Buyer Mineral B Fry Pan

Best price-performance pan on the market

De Buyer Mineral B Pan

If you want to do without Teflon, we recommend the De Buyer Mineral B Element. If it is seasoned well and has a good patina, you can do everything in the De Buyer, which would normally require a coated pan. For us, the De Buyer Mineral B Element is, therefore, the best iron pan. Read the detailed test for this pan here: De Buyer Mineral B Element review.

3. Place: Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line

Schulte-Ufer Profi-Line

Who looks in professional kitchens, often sees stainless steel pans in use. Although these are not as well suited for eggs, fish and other delicate foods, but all the better for the quick hot searing. With a little practice also eggs will succeed in this stainless steel pan. For many years we only use the Schulte-Ufer Profi Line 6451 and are still happy with it. Here is our full review: Schulte-Ufer 6451 I Frying pan Profi-Line

4. Place: Lodge 3 Quart Combo-Cooker

Lodge Combo Cooker

The Lodge Combo Cooker is not actually a pan but consists of a pot and a skillet made of cast iron. But the set doesn’t cost much more than other pans. The workmanship is impeccable and will last a lifetime if handled correctly. The Combo Cooker has many uses (e.g. braising, baking bread or pizza, etc.), which is why we like it so much. Read our full review of the Lodge Combo Cooker

5. Place: Skeppshult Cast Iron Pan with Wooden Handle

Skeppshult Walnut Handle Fry Pan

Skeppshult stands for high-quality workmanship but also for high prices. And the best example is the Skeppshult Walnut Handle Fry Pan. The pan is very well processed but has a limitation because of its handle: it must not be placed in the oven. But because of the handle, you will not burn your hand with this pan. We can recommend the skillet even as it is a bit more expensive. It is perfect as a serving pan too because the beautiful wooden handle makes an impression at the table. You can find the detailed review here: Skeppshult iron pan

6. Place: Cooks Standard Stainless Steel Pan with Dome Lid

Cooks Standard Stainless Steel Dome Lid

The large size of the Cooks Standard Pan makes it a perfect tool for multiple uses. Frying, sautéing, braising, making sauce and more. The dome lid traps the moisture so you can even steam in it and circulates the hot air if you need it. The pan has an aluminum core for even and quick heat distribution. We love the design of the riveted handle. It stays cool for a long time so you can flip your food without burning your hands. The pan works on every heat sorce including induction.

7. Place: Cuisinart Chef’s Classic Sauté Pan

Cuisinart Chef's Classic Sauté Pan

The Cuisinart Chef’s Classic is a very versatile pan with straight sides to maximize capacity. We use it when we want to sear meat or poultry for example. After a bit, we cover the food to simmer to a perfect finish. Or to reduce the liquid with a bit of red wine to a sauce after removing the meat. The tight-fitting lit will serve you well in many situations.
The pan has an Aluminum encapsulated base that helps with a quick and even heat distribution. We like the solid stainless steel riveted handle. It stays cool on the stovetop. A helper handle provides extra support and balance when lifting and pouring sauce for example. This way you really can make use of the whole pan!

The best Pan – this is how we found the best Pans and Skillets

We have tested all the pans we list ourselves and used them over a longer period of time. We cook daily with the pans and thus have a direct comparison. We are independent of pan manufacturers and write our own opinion 100%. The pans we show on our website are also the pans we like to use. We have not included bad pans that do not meet our criteria.

If you need more information to make a decision we are here to help. Read our guide to find the best pan and avoid the biggest mistakes.

Filed under: Pan